Departure for Antarctica

I will be catching my ride this afternoon but I’m afraid that there probably won’t be much opportunity to post for the ship. I hope to be back on the 25th January and setting off for Buenos Aires and home a few days later. I hope that I’m not too sick because I really don’t fancy spending the entire crossing of the Drake Passage looking down into a toilet. The temptation to calculate how much per minute the experience is costing me might be too great.

It snowed this morning and the channel is so rough the sightseeing trips have all been cancelled. It is difficult to believe that we are actually on the same latitude as Carlisle here and that it is midsummer but I guess that the English Lake District does not have such a ruddy great ice field nearby.

I’m thinking of everyone at home and sending my very best wishes at the start of this great adventure.

3 Comments

  • Brian Powell says:

    Hi Nicola . . .

    I know I really SHOULD get with the program but if I check my emails more than once a week I feel like a narcissistic teenager, I know that sounds stupid but I am so NOT into technology.

    Anyway your ongoing travels continue to inspire me even though I tend to take the road more travelled, take the easy way out and keep returning to places I know and like (India, Cambodia mostly).

    I look forward to hearing more about your Antarctic trip (your style of reporting) because I was there for a spell in the late 1970’s when I worked for the Met Office and have often wondered how much the place has changed . . . . . . not much I venture to guess, which is a good thing of course.

    Anyway, good luck and if you DO spend a lot of time staring into a toilet just imagine you’re in your 20’s, in a pub somewhere having a good time!

    Cheers

    Brian (Perth)

  • Chris says:

    Why didn’t you go to the cathedral then? I thought you said it was the most southerly one in the world?

  • Nicola says:

    It seems I got it wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The Iglesia de Merced (church of mercy) in San Martin, Ushuaia is not a cathedral after all; although the fact that it was built by convicts to a simple wooden design gives it an charm all of its own. The honour must go to the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Punta Arenas, Chile, at one degree further north than Ushuaia but still one and a half degrees south of Port Stanley.

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